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Technology and Physiology: Examining How Psychology and Culture Affect How We Relate to Humanoid Objects (alternate title: The Uncanny Valley and the Viability of Virtual Reality: A Science Rather than an Art)

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Date Issued:
2017-04-17
Summary:
Christian Lockley discusses the problem of the uncanny valley - the tendency of humans to perceive humanoid objects that imperfectly resemble people as creepy or strange - in relation to the design of virtual reality, with a particular emphasis on stochastic resonance.
Title: Technology and Physiology: Examining How Psychology and Culture Affect How We Relate to Humanoid Objects (alternate title: The Uncanny Valley and the Viability of Virtual Reality: A Science Rather than an Art).
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Name(s): Christian Lockley, Presenter
FSCJ, college
Type of Resource: moving image
Genre: Presentation
Issuance: single unit
Date Created: 2017-04-17
Date Issued: 2017-04-17
Publisher: Florida State College at Jacksonville
Place of Publication: Jacksonville, FL
Physical Form: moving image
Extent: 13 minutes
Language(s): English
eng
Summary: Christian Lockley discusses the problem of the uncanny valley - the tendency of humans to perceive humanoid objects that imperfectly resemble people as creepy or strange - in relation to the design of virtual reality, with a particular emphasis on stochastic resonance.
Identifier: 20170414_SRC_01_Lockley_Technology_and_Physiology (IID), fscj:64524 (fedora)
Note(s): Christian Lockley discusses the problem of the uncanny valley - the tendency of humans to perceive humanoid objects that imperfectly resemble people as creepy or strange - in relation to the design of virtual reality, with a particular emphasis on stochastic resonance.
Subject(s): Virtual reality.
Augmented reality.
Computer simulation
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fscj/fd/20170414_SRC_01_Lockley_Technology_and_Physiology
Use and Reproduction: free to use
Host Institution: FSCJ